Skip to content

Recommended reading / viewing / listening

This week: Your dog’s mind / John Bercow, the unlikely hero / Baltimore, the fallen city / La Malinche / Slavery in the Pacific

Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism.

1. ‘I shouldn’t really be saying this’: John Bercow on Brexit, backbenchers and why nobody dreams of being speaker
By James Graham | Prospect | April 2019
“The speaker’s chair has become the crucible for the whole Brexit constitutional crisis. And John Bercow is loving it”

2. The Tragedy of Baltimore
By Alec MacGillis | ProPublica | March 2019
“Since Freddie Gray’s death in 2015, violent crime has spiked to levels unseen for a quarter century. How order collapsed in an American city.”

3. Inside the grand and sometimes slimy plan to turn octopuses into lab animals
By Ben Guarino | The Washington Post | March 2019
“In a cavernous laboratory here, scientists are raising thousands of octopuses, cuttlefish and their kin as part of the Cephalopod Program, a three-year-old initiative to transform these sea creatures into the next lab animals. Cephalopods ooze scientific appeal: They have complex bodies, unusual genetics, impressive spatial skills and intelligent minds. Yet the animals can be reluctant to breed, hard to raise and difficult to keep from escaping their tanks.”

4. Let’s Journey Through the Mind of a Dog
By Erica Tennenhouse | The Crux :: Discover | March 2018
“While our grasp of canine cognition may never approach what we know of the human psyche, the latest research has yielded tantalizing nuggets about the inner lives of dogs.”

5. The Democrats’ Dilemma
By Tim Alberta | Politico Magazine | March 2019
“What Ilhan Omar and Dean Phillips tell us about the future of the Democratic Party.”

6. How Regime Change Breeds Demagogues
By Kristen Ghodsee | The New Republic | March 2019
“Economic liberalization can be just as traumatic as military intervention.”

7. Who Was La Malinche?
By Farah Mohammed | JSTOR Daily | March 2019
“La Malinche was a key figure in the conquest of the Aztecs. But was she a heroine or a traitor It depends on whom you ask.”

8. Richmond exhibit seeks to reimagine Confederate statues
By Denise Lavoie | Associated Press | March 2019
“The exhibit grew out of an international design competition that asked architects, planners, designers, and artists to reimagine Monument Avenue, a 5-mile historic urban boulevard where five giant statues of Confederate figures from Virginia stand, including Robert E. Lee, Jefferson Davis, J.E.B. Stuart, Thomas ‘Stonewall’ Jackson and Confederate naval commander Matthew Fontaine Maury.”

9. How the Daughters and Granddaughters of Former Slaves Secured Voting Rights for All
By Martha S. Jones | Smithsonian Magazine | March 2019
“[T]he history of black women and the vote is one about figures who, though subjected to nearly crushing political disabilities, emerged as unparalleled advocates of universal suffrage in its truest sense.”

10. The Trans-Pacific Slave Trade
By Christopher Rose | Not Even Past :: UT Austin Department of History | January 2016
“At the height of the Spanish Empire, the Manila Galleon – an annual flotilla between Manila and Acapulco – was considered the lifeline of Spain’s economy, bringing silver from the mines of New Spain to the markets of Asia. On the reverse trip, the galleons would be loaded with Asian luxury goods, such as spices, silks — and slaves.”

Recommended reading / viewing / listening

This week: The origin of the Moon / Myths of hijab / The Articles of Confederation / Barbie the feminist / Loving or hating AOC

Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism.

1. Where did the Moon come from? A new theory.
By Sarah T. Stewart | TED.com | February 2019
“The Earth and Moon are like identical twins, made up of the exact same materials — which is really strange, since no other celestial bodies we know of share this kind of chemical relationship. What’s responsible for this special connection”

2. Five myths about hijab
By Nadia B. Ahmad and Asifa Quraishi-Landes | The Washington Post | March 2019
“It’s not a headscarf — and it’s not just for women.”

3. The Constitution Most Americans Have Forgotten About
By Peter Feuerherd | JSTOR Daily | March 2017
“The Articles of Confederation set off the long-running feud between states’ rights and Washington, a debate that still rages today.”

4. Five next-gen space rovers
By Imogen Bagnall | The Guardian | February 2019
“The cream of the new breed of craft heading for the moon and beyond”

5. My Life at 47 Is Back to What It Was Like at 27
By Meghan Daum | Medium | February 2019
“Post-divorce, I’ve returned to my old ways.”

6. Barbie, Like her Creator, Is a Feminist
By Susan Shapiro | The Daily Beast | March 2019
“Barbie turns 60 today. When her creator was that age, she launched a business making comfortable prosthetic breasts. On the Dick Cavett Show, she asked the host to feel them.”

7. Hero or villain, Ocasio-Cortez remains a media fixation
By David Bauder | Associated Press | March 2019
“Boldness, youth and an embrace of social media have made AOC — the shorthand is already widely known — a hero to the left, a villain to the right and irresistible to journalists.”

8. With Michael Jackson, It’s Different
By Josephine Livingstone | The New Republic | March 2019
“Why his fall from grace implicates all of us”

9. Wealthy, successful and miserable
By Charles Duhigg | The New York Times Magazine | February 2019
“The upper echelon is hoarding money and privilege to a degree not seen in decades. But that doesn’t make them happy at work.”

10. No Collision
By Bonnie Honig | Boston Review | December 2018
“In the face of climate apocalypse, the rich have been devising escape plans. What happens when they opt out of democratic preparation for emergencies”

Recommended reading / viewing / listening

This week: The hunt for an aircraft carrier / The White House and Fox News / Frida’s brand / Women in coding / What not to do in politics

Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism.

1. The Epic Hunt for a Lost World War II Aircraft Carrier
By Ed Caesar | The New York Times Magazine | March 2019
“In 1942, a volley of torpedoes sent the U.S.S. Wasp to the bottom of the Pacific. For decades, the families of the dead wondered where in the lightless depths of the ocean the ship could possibly be. Earlier this year, a team of wreck hunters set out to find it.”

2. The Marines don’t want you to see what happens when propaganda stops and combat begins
By Alex Horton | The Washington Post | March 2019
“The Marine Corps, like other service branches, dispatches its media wing to curate its own version of war. Everyone knows the deal: The good will be widely distributed, and the violent, the illegal, the inexplicable are wiped from existence.”

3. From Bauhaus to Frauhaus
By Naomi Wood | 1843 :: The Economist | February/March 2019
“Women have been written out of the history of the Bauhaus. As the influential German design school turns 100, Naomi Wood puts them back in.”

4. When The Commander in Chief Is ‘Unfit,’ What’s a General to Do
By James Kitfield | The Daily Beast | March 2019
“Now Trump wants alliances to be protection rackets. The Mattis resignation in protest last year reflected disgust among officers trying to defend the U.S. That’s only gotten worse.”

5. The Making of the Fox News White House
By By Jane Mayer | The New Yorker | March 2019
“Fox News has always been partisan. But has it become propaganda”

6. That Time Tucker Carlson Called Me the C-Word
By Joan Walsh | The Nation | March 2019
“For Fox News, Carlson’s history of foul sexist comments is a plus, not a liability.”

7. The Branding of Frida Kahlo
By Rachel Syme | The New Republic | March 2019
“Can the artist’s things tell us what drove her”

8. How to reduce plastic, foil and other kitchen disposables
By Katherine Roth | Associated Press | August 2018
“Remember that in addition to reducing and reusing, recycling is an easy option for many items, including glass, plastic containers, bottles, cans, clean aluminum foil and batteries.”

9. From Divorce to Blackface: A Short History of Political Taboos
By David Greenberg | Politico Magazine | February 2019
“Americans’ standards are rapidly changing.”

10. The Secret History of Women in Coding
By Clive Thompson | New York Times Magazine | February 2019
“Computer programming once had much better gender balance than it does today. What went wrong”

Recommended reading / viewing / listening

This week: Transgender troops / Deciding what’s sexy / Explain my shyness / Space in relationships / How to crack a whip

Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism.

1. Transgender Troops Caught Between a Welcoming Military and a Hostile Government
By Dave Philipps | The New York Times | March 2019
“This has been an uneasy time for transgender troops in the United States military, caught between a commander in chief who wants them out and court injunctions that, at least temporarily, said they could stay.”

2. There are the 20 books travelers are always leaving behind at their hotels
By Andrea Romano | Travel & Leisure | September 2018
“Topping the list is Margaret Atwood’s dystopian novel from 1985, ‘The Handmaid’s Tale,’ which is now a Golden Globe-winning TV series.”

3. How I Learned to Embrace Power as a Woman in Washington
By Wendy Sherman | Politico Magazine | September 2018
“It took the better part of a career in Washington, where calcified work structures make it so difficult for women, to learn how to be comfortable owning my own power—a necessary step if you are to wield it successfully.”

4. Who Decides What’s ‘Sexy’ — And Who Pays for It
By Soraya Roberts | The New York Times Magazine | January 2018
“After more than 120 years of use, ‘sexy’ resists overnight reconstruction. We may try to chip away at Venus’s stone curves, but the transformation is slow and complex. Women can lay their claim to it … but a tradition of objectification persists.”

5. Why Am I Shy
CrowdScience :: BBC World Service | March 2019
“Is shyness down to nature or nurture – and how can you overcome it if it’s causing anxiety”

6. A coral reef cemetery is home to life in the afterlife
By Kelli Kennedy | Associated Press | August 2018
“[T]he Neptune Memorial Reef is home to the cremated remains of 1,500 people, and any snorkeler or scuba diver can visit.”

7. How a Uruguayan town revolutionized the way we eat
By Shafik Meghji | BBC Travel | January 2019
“Located on the banks of the Uruguay River and named after a 17th-Century hermit, the sleepy town of Fray Bentos produced one of the most influential food brands of the 20th Century.”

8. People Didn’t Used to Ask for ‘Space’ in Their Relationships
By Julie Beck | The Atlantic | December 2018
“The expression caught on in the 1970s and is now so common as to be a cliché — but it’s still as confusing as ever.”

9. How to declutter your mind
By Ryder Carroll | Ideas :: TED.com | February 2019
“Write down the things that you need to do, the things that you should be doing, and the things that you want to do.”

10. How to Crack a Whip
By Malia Wollan | Tip :: The New York Times Magazine | February 2019
“Bring the whip up to about eye level and then flick your wrist groundward. Repeat until you get a consistent burst of noise.”

Recommended reading / viewing / listening

This week: The Native American Alamo / The depths of personal loneliness / The ultimate guide to presidential impeachment / What obsessed Hitchcock, Welles and Kubrick / Lady Gaga’s tattoos

Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism.

1. NASA Captures First Air-to-Air Images of Supersonic Shockwave Interaction in Flight
By Matt Kamlet | NASA | March 2019
“The images were captured during the fourth phase of Air-to-Air Background Oriented Schlieren flights, or AirBOS, which took place at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California. ”

2. All Quiet on the Western Front becomes instant bestseller – archive, 1929
By Richard Nelsson | From the Archive :: The Guardian | March 2019
“Ninety years ago, a harrowing account of warfare in the first world war was brought to an international audience by German veteran Erich Maria Remarque”

3. Native Americans want to re-imagine Alamo as a cemetery
By Elaine Ayala | San Antonio Express-News | February 2019
“Long before it was the site of a famous battle, the Alamo was where the city’s earliest citizens lived, worked, died and were buried. They were the city’s first Catholics and helped forge the city and state’s future.”

4. What’s the Loneliest You’ve Ever Felt
By Kristen Radtke | The Atlantic | October 2018
“The author started a project on loneliness by asking this simple question. Many people quickly recounted experiences, often with surprising specificity.”

5. The only impeachment guide you’ll ever need
By Darren Samuelsohn | Politico Magazine | January 2019
“In one sense, Trump is as vulnerable as he’s always been. In another, the risk is huge. The collision of anti-Trump forces with his powerfully loyal base — to say nothing of the president’s own thirst for conflict — would guarantee the most explosive political disruption in generations. If the effort misses, the blowback could easily propel Trump back into office in 2020, with a reinvigorated base bent on revenge.”

6. Netflix Holds the Key to Preserving Film’s Vanishing History
By K. Austin Collins | Vanity Fair | November 2018
The Other Side of the Wind and Shirkers show how the streaming giant could save historic films — even as past-facing services like FilmStruck prove unsustainable.”

7. The Obsessions of Hitchcock, Welles, and Kubrick
By Jonathan Kirshner | Boston Review | June 2017
“The book concludes with the observation that our heroes shared the ability to ‘triumph’ over ‘the ordinary, the conventional, the banal.’ Certainly they did. But surely there was more.”

8. All of Lady Gaga’s tattoos and their meanings
By Melissa Minton | Page Six :: The New York Post | February 2019
“[S]he has called the left half of her body her ‘Iggy Pop’ side, and the tattoo-less right side her ‘Marilyn Monroe.’ ”

9. The dollar is still king. How (in the world) did that happen
By Peter S. Goodman | The New York Times | February 2019
“The enduring potency of the dollar gives force to President Trump’s mode of engagement.”

10. Who Killed Tulum
By Reeves Wiedeman | The Cut :: New York Magazine | February 2019
“Greed, gringos, diesel, drugs, shamans, seaweed, and a disco ball in the jungle.”

Recommended reading / viewing / listening

This week: Peace in Colombia through hip-hop / The peak of intelligence in each of us / The beauty and power of a living wage / Why are psychopaths attractive? / The everlasting power of failure

Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism.

1. Colombia’s Hip-Hop Gardener Fuels a Green Resistance
By Jake Kincaid | OZY | March 2019
“Luis ‘AKA’ Ramírez brings young and old together to heal a traumatized slice of Medellín.”

2. TRADOC to take responsibility for Army Center of Military History
By Sean Kimmons | Army News Service | March 2019
“The Army Center of Military History will realign under Army Training and Doctrine Command April 1 to better promote history at schoolhouses across the force. …”

3. When Does Intelligence Peak
By Scott Barry Kaufman | Beautiful Minds :: Scientific American | March 2019
“Maybe that’s not even the right question.”

4. Dollars on the margins
By Matthew Desmond | The New York Times Magazine | February 2019
“A living wage is an antidepressant. It is a sleep aid. A diet. A stress reliever. It is a contraceptive, preventing teenage pregnancy. It prevents premature death. It shields children from neglect.”

5. Are psychopaths attracted to other psychopaths
By Scott Berry Kaufman | Beautiful Minds :: Scientific American | January 2019
“Psychopathic birds of a feather flock together”

6. The Silence of Classical Literature’s Women
By Sophie Gilbert | The Atlantic | September 2018
“Pat Barker’s retelling of The Iliad imagines the Trojan War from the perspective of a female slave fought over by two Greek heroes.”

7. What We Can Learn About Gender From The Matrix
By Andrea Long Chu | Vulture | February 2019
” He is, after all, an abortive man, a beta trapped in an alpha’s body. Those around him assume he is a leader, a provider, a president, but his greatest fear is that they are mistaken.”

8. How to Walk 100,000 Steps in One Day
By David Paul Kirkpatrick | Medium | January 2019
“At 66 years old, I challenged myself to reach a big fitness goal. That meant creating the right mindset as well as increasing my physical endurance.”

9. There’s a surprising power in not winning — here’s how to make it work for you
By Monica Wadhwa | Ideas :: TED.com | February 2019
“When we come this close to triumph, we gain potent energy that we can use to fuel later success”

10. The Insect Apocalypse Is Here
By Brooke Jarvis | The New York Times Magazine | November 2018
“What does it mean for the rest of life on Earth”

Recommended reading / viewing / listening

This week: Gayle King’s R Kelly interview / Mental illness as an evolutionary trait / The world built for men / Are you feeling love or lust? / The reign of komodo dragons

Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism.

1. The AI-Art Gold Rush Is Here
By Ian Bogost | The Atlantic | March 2019
“An artificial-intelligence “artist” got a solo show at a Chelsea gallery. Will it reinvent art, or destroy it?”

2. Susceptibility to Mental Illness May Have Helped Humans Adapt over the Millennia
By Dana G. Smith | Scientific American | March 2019
“Psychiatrist Randolph Nesse, one of the founders of evolutionary medicine, explains why natural selection did not rid our species of onerous psychiatric disorders”

3. Kelly interview becomes a spotlight moment for Gayle King
By David Bauder | Associated Press | March 2019
“King proved unflappable as a crying Kelly leaped up in anger. … [S]he didn’t flinch from challenging the singer as he denied multiple allegations that he sexually abused underage girls and was controlling in his relationships. She drew praise for her performance.”

4. The deadly truth about a world built for men — from stab vests to car crashes
By Caroline Criado-Perez | The Guardian | February 2019
“Crash-test dummies based on the ‘average’ male are just one example of design that forgets about women — and puts lives at risk”

5. A Message in a Bottle Washed Up on Padre Island — 57 Years Later
By Dan Solomon | Texas Monthly | February 2019
“The missive was part of a 1962 study that attempted to track the flow of ocean currents.”

6. How Does Spotify Know You So Well
By Sophia Ciocca | Medium | October 2017
“A software engineer explains the science behind personalized music recommendations”

7. Is it lust or is it love How to tell — and how you can have both at once
By Terri Orbuch | Ideas: TED Talks | February 2018
“I’ve studied the romances and relationship patterns of thousands of people for three decades, and I’ve heard many of them talk about that wild, out-of-control feeling at the beginning of a new relationship. …”

8. Why do zebras have stripes Perhaps to dazzle away flies
By Danica Kirka | Associated Press | February 2019
“The researchers found that fewer horseflies landed on the cloaked horses than on the ones without striped coats, suggesting that zebra stripes may offer protection from blood-sucking insects that can spread disease.”

9. Former deputy chief inspector for NYPD dies at 104 years old
By Larry Celona and Ben Feuerherd | The New York Post | February 2019
“Former NYPD Deputy Chief Inspector John Downer, who joined the force in 1941 and served more than 30 years, died …”

10. Why Komodo Dragons Haven’t Conquered the World
By Veronique Greenwood | The New York Times | November 2018
“The razor-toothed predators are fierce, but scientists found that they’re real homebodies. “

craftyintellectual.wordpress.com/

Where Learning and Crafting Come Together

NYC Wine Guys

When these 2 Italian guys get together, it always starts with wine.

Prof Andy Lowe

growing smarter

AVID WANDERERS: GEOFF & JENNI'S TRAVEL BLOG

A COLLECTION OF OUR RAMBLINGS AND TRAVEL PHOTOS

Awakening the Light of Wisdom

Expressions of the Inner Spiritual Journey

Transformation Earth Music

"Writing a song is like discovering a beautiful jewel. You didn't create it, but since it is so beautiful you want to share it with the world."

Raising Mama

Stories, antidotes and rants about what happens when you change roles...

Bold Thoughts

Lets Think Bright For A Change!!

www.Brainwashed-children-divorce.info www.離婚中被洗腦的兒童.org

A community for those involved with the Family Court of Hong Kong. We would like to hear your story about Family Court in Hong Kong. Languages English and Traditional Chinese. Established April 16, 2018. 一個涉及香港家事法庭的社群成立於2018年4月16日。我們希望可以聽聽你對於家事法庭的故事. 英文語言及繁體中文. -- 離婚中被洗腦的兒童」是虐待兒童 父母疏離是涉及已分配孩子的父母的. Site format best viewed from a computer.

नन्हें पखं (Wings)

मेरी उड़ान (Flight)

Starting from the Middle

A thirty-something's journey to a new life

ORGANIZED LIFE TODAY

LEAVE CHAOS BEHIND ORGANIZATION LEADS TO PEACE OF MIND

SheLikes2Write

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

pslovepersia

A glimpse into my life

Novel Learning

Sharing what I have learned from what I have read: A blog by Joe Abittan

Ashburton Museum

History With Heart

Royal Akarana Yacht Club

The home of blue water sailing

%d bloggers like this: