Recommended reading / viewing / listening

This week: Learning from the losers / Spend the holidays with some generals at war / Our love affair with bookstores / A critical look at Barack Obama / Presidential sex scandals

This week: Learning from the losers / Spend the holidays with some generals at war / Our love affair with bookstores / A critical look at Barack Obama / Presidential sex scandals

Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism. Learn more about my academic background here.

1. What Trump Showed Us About America
Politico Magazine | November 2020
“A disruptive presidency is coming to a close. Here’s what 35 thinkers say it revealed — not about the man, but about the rest of us.”

2. Generals at War: The television series.
National Geographic | 2010
“[The] series takes a fresh approach to the great battles of World War Two, examining them through the decisions, dilemmas and disasters of the generals on both sides.”
Watch the episodes: El Alamein | Stalingrad | Kursk | Singapore | The Bulge | Midway

3. The Etiquette of Defeat: What Donald Trump Can Learn From History’s Biggest Losers
By Daniel Mendelsohn | Vanity Fair | November 2020
“From ancient Macedonia to recent Emmy Awards, history offers good and bad examples of how to handle not winning.”

4. How to Suture a Wound
By Malia Wollan | Tip :: The New York Times Magazine | August 2020
“A medical-grade suture kit is the most hygienic option, of course, but sometimes you have to improvise.”

5. A Literary History of the Writerly Love Affair with Bookstores
By Jorge Carrion | Lit Hub | November 2020
“Good bookshops are questions without answers. They are places that provoke you intellectually, encode riddles, surprise and offer challenges, hypnotize with that melody — or cacophony — which creates light and shadows, shelves, stairs, front-covers, doors opening, umbrellas closing, head movements indicating hello or goodbye, people on the move.”

6. Blackjack with Matthew McConaughey
By Simon Willis | 1843 :: The Economist | November 2020
“The smooth-talking Hollywood actor reveals his hand”

7. Barack Obama Doesn’t Have the Answers
By Osita Nwanevu | The New Republic | November 2020
“The former president seems unable to reckon with the failures of his presidency and diagnose the Republican Party’s incurable nihilism.”
— Also see from Politico: Could Obama Have Been Great?

8. A Look At Grand Army Plaza’s $8.9 Million Restoration Design
By Jen Cheng | Gothamist | November 2020
“The arch, which was dedicated in 1892, is the main focus of the restoration work.”

9. A Presidential Affair: The Secret, Salacious Sex Scandals of U.S. Presidents
By Joyzel Acevedo | Rummaging Through the Attic :: Jezebel | October 2020
“[P]olitical figures and their sex lives were frequent topics of discussion in the press throughout most of the 19th century. But things shifted in the early 1900s, with the establishment of the National Press Club.”

10. Can I get the coronavirus twice?
Viral Questions :: Associated Press | September 2020
“It seems possible, though how often it happens isn’t known.”

Recommended reading / viewing / listening

This week: The enduring strength of hurricanes / Recovering 1980s fashion for ‘The Crown’ / Make a wildflower bomb / The glory of sleep retreats / Picking the right hand sanitizer

This week: The enduring strength of hurricanes / Recovering 1980s fashion for ‘The Crown’ / Make a wildflower bomb / The glory of sleep retreats / Picking the right hand sanitizer

Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism. Learn more about my academic background here.

1. Hurricanes stay stronger longer after landfall than in past
By Seth Borenstein | Associated Press | November 2020
“The new study looked at 71 Atlantic hurricanes with landfalls since 1967. It found that in the 1960s, hurricanes declined two-thirds in wind strength within 17 hours of landfall. But now it generally takes 33 hours for storms to weaken that same degree.”

2. Can America restore the rule of law without prosecuting Trump?
By Jonathan Mahler | The New York Times Magazine | November 2020
“Donald Trump’s potential criminal liability is the key to understanding his presidency. When he leaves office, it will present the country with a historic dilemma.”

3. ‘Charles is very stylish’: how The Crown‘s costume designer brought 1980s to life
By Hannah Marriott | The Guardian | November 2020
“Season 4’s wardrobe includes Diana’s Cinderella dress and Thatcher’s power shoulders”

4. How to Make a Wildflower Bomb
By Malia Wollan | Tip :: The New York Times Magazine | March 2020
“Before you go launching wildflower seed projectiles, start with a solid recipe.”

5. The Texas governor who refused to concede after losing a bitter election
By Gillian Brockell | The Washington Post | November 2020
“The incumbent refused to concede. He had lost reelection, by a lot, but he claimed it was only because of election fraud. He appealed his case to the courts and called on militias to defend him. … This is a story about a Texas governor who barricaded himself in the governor’s office and refused to give up control.”

6. Farewell to Jim Cooke, the Greatest Art Director Alive
By Angelica Alzona | Jezebel | November 2020
“If you’ve ever enjoyed the art on any of our websites in their various iterations over the past decade, you have one man to thank: creative director, illustrator, designer, and art team father-of-four Jim Cooke.”

7. ‘Storm Tracker’ Maps Shows How Hurricanes Spread Invasive Species
By Theresa Machemer | Smithsonian Magazine | October 2020
“The U.S. Geological Survey launched the program in 2018 after hurricanes Harvey, Irma, Maria and Nate scrambled coastal ecosystems”

8. Need more ZZZ’s? Sleep retreats are a (glorious) thing
By Stephanie Vermillion | OZY | January 2020
“While the effects of sleep deprivation are ugly, the retreat destinations where you can address it are anything but.”

9. Married sex is like making risotto: always nice, but often you can’t be arsed
By Romesh Ranganathan | The Guardian | October 2020
“I know other couples who have just accepted that sex is now too much effort, and have given up altogether. And while I believe that acceptance will bring them nothing but happiness, I do worry about what not having sex means for our relationship.”

10. What should I look for in a hand sanitizer?
Viral Questions :: Associated Press | September 2020
“Pick one that contains mostly alcohol, and has few other ingredients.”

Recommended reading / viewing / listening

This week: The future of the space station / Protect yourself from conspiracy theories / Decline of local news poses a new problem / A private tutor’s secret life / The adventures of fighting fires

This week: The future of the space station / Protect yourself from conspiracy theories / Decline of local news poses a new problem / A private tutor’s secret life / The adventures of fighting fires

Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism. Learn more about my academic background here.

1. What happens when NASA retires the International Space Station?
By Andrea Leinfelder | Houston Chronicle | October 2020
“The space station is authorized for human habitation through 2024, and Congress is expected to extend that to 2030. NASA believes the orbiting lab will survive at least another 10 years, and there’s precedent for long-lasting space hardware”

2. Ancient tectonic plate discovered beneath Canada, geologists claim
By Michael Irving | New Atlas | Ocotober 2020
“The face of the Earth has changed drastically over its life, with plates shifting and sinking. Now, geologists at the University of Houston claim to have found the remains of an ancient tectonic plate beneath Canada that was pushed under the surface tens of millions of years ago.”

3. Conspiracy theories: Why some people are susceptible and how to protect yourself
By Angela Haupt | The Washington Post | October 2020
“Conspiracy theories such as these swirl around us like noxious germs, targeting the mind instead of the body. And in the same way that our immune system can leave us more vulnerable to pathogens, our emotional state can make us more open to false — and potentially harmful — beliefs.”

4. How to Talk to Someone With Alzheimer’s
By Malia Wollan | Tip :: The New York Times Magazine | December 2019
“Approach someone with Alzheimer’s from the front. If the person doesn’t recognize you, say your name.”

5. The decline of local newsrooms could make it harder for us to detect the next disease outbreak
By Lauren Harris | Columbia Journalism Review | October 2020
“Here’s the irony: our society is better positioned to recognize the value of monitoring local journalism for viral warning signs—but the local news ecosystem is more beleaguered than ever.”

6. ‘One By Willie’
Texas Monthly | September 2020
“But this series isn’t just about the songs. It’s about what music really means to us — the ways it can change us, take care of us, and connect us all.”

7. First-class flights, chauffeurs and bribery: the secret life of a private tutor
By Emma Irving | 1843 :: The Economist | October 2020
“Tutoring has become a weapon in the global arms race in education. There’s no limit to what some parents will pay”

8. 3,000-Year-Old Orbs Provide a Glimpse of Ancient Sport
By Christopher Intagliata | Scientific American | October 2020
“Researchers say three ancient leather balls, dug up from the tombs of horsemen in northwestern China, are the oldest such specimens from Europe or Asia.”

9. ‘I got the bug’: a pioneering wildfire fighter on the thrills and threats of the job
By Gabrielle Canon | The Guardian | September 2020
“Sara Sweeney, the first woman to lead her unit, once couldn’t imagine fighting fires. Now she doesn’t want to stop”

10. What Just Happened in Peru? Understanding Vizcarra’s Sudden Impeachment
By Alonso Gurmendi Dunkelberg | Americas Quarterly | November 2020
“Expect more populism ahead in one of the world’s hardest-hit countries by COVID-19.”

Recommended reading / viewing / listening

This week: Teaching during the pandemic / The NYC subway map reimagined / !!!!!!!!! / Remembering Lolita the orca / Inventor of Rubik’s Cube still at play

This week: Teaching during the pandemic / The NYC subway map reimagined / !!!!!!!!! / Remembering Lolita the orca / Inventor of Rubik’s Cube still at play

Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism. Learn more about my academic background here.

1. In-person classes, Internet snafus, melancholy hallways: This is what teaching in a pandemic is like
By Nikkina McKnight | The Lily :: The Washington Post | October 2020
“Read one teacher’s 30-day diary, plus responses from readers around the world”

2. New York’s Digital Subway Map Comes Alive
By Christopher Bonanos | Curbed :: New York Magazine | October 2020
“In this dire year for New York City and its transit system, this digital launch is a rare moment of things looking up.”

3. Rogue Rocky Planet Found Adrift in the Milky Way
By Nola Taylor Redd | Scientific American | October 2020
“The diminutive world and others like it could help astronomers probe the mysteries of planet formation”

4. How to Spot a Counterfeit Watch
By Malia Wollan | Tip :: The New York Times Magazine | December 2019
“On the watch’s face, inspect the magnifying lens over the date, which is often not as strong on counterfeits.”

5. How the ‘right stuff’ to be an astronaut has changed over the years
By Jay Bennett | NatGeo | October 2020
“The first humans flew into space nearly 60 years ago from the deserts of southern Kazakhstan and the Atlantic shores of Florida. Since then, we’ve learned a lot about what it takes to leave the planet.”

6. Countering the tyranny of the clock
The Economist | October 2020
“How flexible working is changing workers’ relationship with time”

7. Read This Article!!!
By Julie Beck | The Atlantic | June 2018
“How many exclamation points do you need to seem genuinely enthusiastic?”

8. Native Americans honor Lolita the orca 50 years after capture: ‘She was taken’
By Cara McKenna | The Guardian | September 2020
“The southern resident orca, whom the Washington state-based nation calls Sk’aliCh’elh-tenaut, was taken from waters off Penn Cove in Lummi territory when she was four years old.”

9. He Invented the Rubik’s Cube. He’s Still Learning From It.
By Alexandra Alter | The New York Times | September 2020
“Erno Rubik, who devised one of the world’s most popular and enduring puzzles, opens up about his creation in his new book, ‘Cubed.'”

10. Is it safe to drink from a water fountain during the pandemic?
Viral Questions :: Associated Press | August 2020
“There’s no evidence you can get COVID-19 from the water itself. But since the virus may linger on surfaces, experts say to avoid fountains if you can or to limit any direct contact when using them.”

Recommended reading / viewing / listening

This week: What happens if Trump doesn’t go? / COVID-19 and the English language / The history of ‘cuck’ / The loneliness of Prince / Coronavirus and secondhand smoke

This week: What happens if Trump doesn’t go? / COVID-19 and the English language / The history of ‘cuck’ / The loneliness of Prince / Coronavirus and secondhand smoke

Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism. Learn more about my academic background here.

1. What Will You Do if Trump Doesn’t Leave?
By David Brooks | The New York Times | September 2020
“Playing out the nightmare scenario.”

2. How COVID-19 is changing the English language
By Roger J. Kreuz | The Conversation | September 2020
“A perennial issue for lexicographers is deciding whether or not a term has enough staying power to be enshrined in the dictionary. The COVID-19 pandemic has produced its fair share of new terms that are blends of other words, and many of these are on the editors’ watch list.”

3. The Long, Violent Literary History of Calling Someone a ‘Cuck’
By Eliott Grover | Inside Hook | October 2020
“From the Trojan War to Shakespeare, the oft-ridiculed archetype has always had much darker implications”

4. How to Build a Moat
By Malia Wollan | Tip :: The New York Times Magazine | October 2019
“Don’t expect your moat to stop swimmers not wearing armor.”

5. What We Talk About When We Talk About Magical Realism
By Fernando Sdrigotti | LA Review of Books | October 2020
“If anything, magical realism — in its juggling of exoticism and legibility, a combo that Edward Said would have called Orientalist when occurring in other elsewheres — is a practical marketing ploy, a reduction by means not of absurdity but of obfuscation — a crude simplification through fuzziness.”

6. Prince Was One of the Loneliest Souls I’ve Ever Met
By Neal Karlen | LitHub | October 2020
“After knowing him in forever-alternating cycles of greater, lesser, and sometimes not-at-all friendship over the final 31 years of his life, until our final peculiar phone conversation three weeks before he died: His greatest—and perhaps only—fear was dying alone.”

7. ‘This is really a government which doesn’t seem to be able to control the situation’ — Iraq
The Intelligence :: The Economist | October 2020
“A pilgrimage that is sure to become a COVID-19 hotspot is a sign of how much the country’s government is losing legitimacy to its clergymen and tribal leaders.”

8. How ‘Goodfellas’ and the Gangster Class of 1990 Changed Hollywood
By Jason Bailey | The New York Times | September 2020
“That autumn, The Godfather Part III was hotly anticipated. Instead, the Scorsese movie and other crime tales raised the stakes for filmmakers to come.”

9. As an anxious internet nerd, my relationships are thriving during lockdown
By Laurie Penny | The Guardian | September 2020
“Since lockdown began, I’ve moved three times, lost jobs and been separated from my family – but my online community hasn’t changed”

10. Can you get the coronavirus from secondhand smoke?
Viral Questions :: Associated Press | August 2020
“Secondhand smoke isn’t believed to directly spread the virus, experts say, but infected smokers may blow droplets carrying the virus when they exhale.”

Recommended reading / viewing / listening

This week: When a nation doesn’t have a functioning president / Returning a tribal item / Sade remains the queen of chill / The life of George Floyd / Coronavirus and pregnancy

This week: When a nation doesn’t have a functioning president / Returning a tribal item / Sade remains the queen of chill / The life of George Floyd / Coronavirus and pregnancy

Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism. Learn more about my academic background here.

1. Lip service
By Geoff Edgers | The Washington Post | October 2020
“Sarah Cooper became famous mocking Trump. She’ll be just fine if he loses.”

2. What happens to national security and foreign relations if the president is incapacitated?
By Gordon Adams | The Conversation | October 2020
“[A]t a time when many senior officials – including most of the Joint Chiefs of Staff – are quarantining, the country is not completely rudderless. That’s true even in a situation where the vice president has not become acting president, or if there are political or legal battles over the succession process.”

3. How a Scrap of Papyrus Launched a Reconsideration of Early Christianity
By Ariel Sabar | LitHub | October 2020
“But in the late 1800s, fragments of papyrus bearing traces of these lost scriptures began turning up at archaeological sites and antiquities shops across Egypt. The story they told about the earliest centuries of Christianity would force historians to reexamine almost everything they thought they knew about the world’s predominant faith.”

4. How to Return a Tribal Item
By Malia Wollan | Tip :: The New York Times Magazine | October 2019
“You will be asked to describe it, and often to submit a photo.”

5. George Floyd’s America: Born with two strikes
By Toluse Olorunnipa and Griff Witte | The Washington Post | October 2020
“How systemic racism shaped Floyd’s life and hobbled his ambition”

6. The peril and the promise
By Henry Curr | The Economist | October 2020
“The covid-19 pandemic will accelerate change in the world economy. That brings both opportunity and danger.”

7. Why singer Sade is the queen of quarantine and chill
By Chuck Arnold | The New York Post | October 2020
“Clearly, she likes to take her sweet time, and if anyone is allowed to move at her own chill pace amidst all the stresses of the world, it’s Sade.”

8. Why you should read this out loud
By Sophie Hardach | BBC Future | September 2020
“Most adults retreat into a personal, quiet world inside their heads when they are reading, but we may be missing out on some vital benefits when we do this.”

9. The eight secrets to a (fairly) fulfilled life
By Oliver Burkeman | The Guardian | September 2020
“What follows isn’t intended as an exhaustive summary. But these are the principles that surfaced again and again, and that now seem to me most useful for navigating times as baffling and stress-inducing as ours.”

10. Can a pregnant woman spread the coronavirus to her fetus?
Viral Questions :: Associated Press | July 2020
“It’s possible, but it seems to be relatively rare and scientists think they know why that is.”

Recommended reading / viewing / listening

This week: Deceptive influencers / Nude celebs for voters / Five myths of the 25th / The military’s role in election chaos / Dress code for biking

This week: Deceptive influencers / Nude celebs for voters / Five myths of the 25th / The military’s role in election chaos / Dress code for biking

Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism. Learn more about my academic background here.

1. ‘Fake Private Plane Girls’: The Deceptive Genius of the Influencer Backdrop Economy
By Hazel Cills | Jezebel | September 2020
“[O]n social media — where living and documenting a life of luxurious travel can become a lucrative way to make a living — fake private jets, apartments, and mesmerizing photoshoot locations are almost as common as the real deal.”

2. More penises are appearing on TV and in film – but why are nearly all of them prosthetic?
By Peter Lehman | The Conversation | October 2020
“To me, this says something about the unusual significance we continue to grant the penis, along with our cultural need to carefully regulate its representation. In a way, the use of prosthetic penises maintains a certain mystique about masculinity, preserving the power of the phallus.”

3. Celebs getting naked to beg for votes is yet another downfall of 2020
By Kirsten Fleming | The New York Post | October 2020
“But if voting isn’t a joke, who the hell gave the OK to the actors and comedians like Tiffany Haddish, Sarah Silverman and Chris Rock (why, Chris Rock? Why?!) to get naked in the most cringeworthy celeb mashup since that black-and-white anti-racism video.”

4. How to Build a Latrine
By Malia Wollan | Tip :: The New York Times Magazine | September 2019
“To construct a basic pit latrine, you don’t need engineers, special equipment or much money.”

5. Specter of election chaos raises questions on military role
By Robert Burns and Lolita C. Baldor | Associated Press | October 2020
“Gen. Mark Milley, who as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff is the nation’s top military officer, has told Congress the military is committed to staying apolitical and steering clear of any election role.”

6. Five myths about the 25th Amendment
By Joel K. Goldstein | Five Myths :: The Washington Post | October 2020
“It’s not just about physical incapacity, and it doesn’t provide for removal of a president.”

7. The Age of Innocence: How a U.S. classic defined its era
By Cameron Laux | The American Century :: BBC Culture | September 2020
“Wharton was no friend of change. She didn’t like feminism, and she saw the worship of status in Old New York being swept away and replaced by the worship of money — hardly a forward step. But the story of Newland Archer and his tribe (also her own tribe, let’s not forget) is expressed with an elegant and complex ambivalence.”

8. Girl meets bike: but what should she wear?
By Pamela Druckerman | 1843 :: The Economist | September 2020
“A Parisian guide to dressing for two wheels”

9. How artificial salt marshes can help in the fight against rising seas
By Patrick Greenfield | The Guardian | September 2020
“Made from Crossrail clay, Europe’s biggest coastal habitat restoration project is a valuable flood defence but is itself threatened by climate change”

10. Can I get COVID-19 through my eyes or ears?
Viral Questions :: Associated Press | June 2020
“As with the nose and mouth, doctors say the eyes may be a route of infection if someone with the virus coughs or sneezes nearby.”

Recommended reading / viewing / listening

This week: The antibody test / The real Danny Trejo / The tsunami that changed history / The joy of cleaning / The sexual power of colonization

This week: The antibody test / The real Danny Trejo / The tsunami that changed history / The joy of cleaning / The sexual power of colonization

Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism. Learn more about my academic background here.

1. THE CHOICE 2020: Trump vs. Biden
Frontline :: PBS | September 2020
“Michael Kirk and his team, hear from friends, family, colleagues and adversaries about the challenges that shaped Trump and Biden’s lives and could inform how they confront the crises facing the nation at this pivotal juncture.”

2. A ‘Great Gatsby’ Quote Takes On New Resonance
By Ian Prasad Philbrick | The New York Times | October 2020
“People critical of the president’s and other Republicans’ behavior have been sharing a line from the Fitzgerald novel about the wealthy characters whose “carelessness” harms everyone around them.”

3. How Danny Trejo Built a Decades-Long Film Career After Prison
By Cat Cardenas | Texas Monthly | September 2020
“After years of playing ex-cons and bodyguards, the prolific actor became an iconic leading man in Robert Rodriguez’s Machete series.”

4. How to Tell Gunfire From Fireworks
By Malia Wollan | Tip :: The New York Times Magazine | August 2019
“Pay attention to the intensity of each pulse.”

5. How a ‘forgotten’ 600-year-old tsunami changed history
By Megan Gannon | National Geographic | May 2019
“New evidence shows a disaster similar to the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami battered the same region centuries ago and may have given rise to a powerful Islamic kingdom.”

6. Empire and Degradation
By Rafia Zakaria | The Baffler | September 2020
“On the links between colonialism and sexual control”

7. The great experiment
By Emily Anthes | The Washington Post | September 2020
“The pandemic is tragic. It’s also an incredible chance to study human behavior.”

8. Lather me than you: the joy of soap
By Catherine Nixey | 1843 :: The Economist | September 2020
“Cleaning has long been the preserve of women. It’s time to burst some bubbles”

9. The spy who couldn’t spell: how the biggest heist in the history of US espionage was foiled
By Yudhijit Bhattacharjee | The Guardian | October 2016
“Ever since childhood, Brian Regan had been made to feel stupid because of his severe dyslexia. So he thought no one would suspect him of stealing secrets”

10. What can a COVID-19 antibody test tell me?
Viral Questions :: Associated Press | May 2020
“An antibody test might show if you had COVID-19 in the recent past, which most experts think gives people some protection from the virus. The tests are different from the nasal swab tests that determine if you’re currently sick.”

Recommended reading / viewing / listening

This week: Dating in the COVID-19 era / The stories that still stand today / Coronavirus and currency / New armor for Marines / Enduring and accepting fat

This week: Dating in the COVID-19 era / The stories that still stand today / Coronavirus and currency / New armor for Marines / Enduring and accepting fat

Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism. Learn more about my academic background here.

1. Colin Powell Still Wants Answers
By Robert Draper | The New York Times Magazine | July 2020
“In 2003, he made the case for invading Iraq to halt its weapons programs. The analysts who provided the intelligence now say it was doubted inside the C.I.A. at the time.”

2. Coronavirus FAQs: What Are The New Dating Rules? And What About Hooking Up?
By Isabella Gomez Sarmiento | NPR | September 2020
“Their main takeaway? Just like before the pandemic, open and honest communication is key.”

3. With schools closed, public libraries are being used as day-care centers, angering some people
By Samantha Schmidt | The Washington Post | September 2020
“Nationwide, millions of working parents, especially working mothers, are dealing with the same dilemma. Remote-learning plans require full-time working parents to find care for an average of 43.5 hours a week, roughly triple the amount of child-care time they needed before the pandemic, according to a report from the Urban Institute.”
Also see, from Apollo: Public libraries have been vital in times of crisis — from conflict to Covid-19

4. Stories of Then That Still Hold Up Now
The New York Times Book Review | September 2020
“Margaret Atwood, Héctor Tobar, Thomas Mallon and Brenda Wineapple on older political novels they admire that have a lot to say about the world today.”

5. Rain is sizzling bacon, cars are lions roaring: the art of sound in movies
By Jordan Kisner | The Guardian | July 2015
“Skip Lievsay is one of the most talented men in Hollywood. He has created audioscapes for Martin Scorsese and is the only sound man the Coen brothers go to. But the key to this work is more than clever effects, it is understanding the human mind”

6. Can the coronavirus survive on paper currency?
Viral Question :: Associated Press | May 2020
“Yes, but experts say the risk of getting the virus from cash is low compared with person-to-person spread, which is the main way people get infected.”

7. Estoria Da Boca
By Steven Lee Moya | Mixcloud | April 2020
“Playing tracks by Astrud Gilberto, Afternoons In Stereo, Bebel Gilberto, Abicah Soul and Kyoto Jazz Massive.”

8. Marines to get better-fitting, lighter body armor
Stars and Stripes | April 2020
“Tests of a prototype of the new vest, which is around 25% lighter than the legacy system, showed that it also significantly reduces fatigue in the field. …”

9. The friendly Mr Wu
By Mara Hvistendahl | 1843 :: The Economist | April / May 2020
“The weakest link in America’s national security may not be foreign technology but its own people. Mara Hvistendahl traces the story of the single mother who sold out to China”

10. The Truth About Fat
NOVA :: PBS | April 2020
“Could it be that body fat has more to do with biological processes than personal choices?”

Recommended reading / viewing / listening

This week: The future of the office / Faces of power / COVID-19 on my phone? / Meeting the “macho banana” / Autism and friendships

This week: The future of the office / Faces of power / COVID-19 on my phone? / Meeting the “macho banana” / Autism and friendships

Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism. Learn more about my academic background here.

1. Is the office finished?
The Economist | September 2020
“The fight over the future of the workplace”
Also see, from The Guardian: Covid will force us to reimagine the office. Let’s get it right this time

2. Faces of Power: 80% Are White, Even as U.S. Becomes More Diverse
By Denise Lu, Jon Huang, Ashwin Seshagiri, Haeyoun Park and Troy Griggs | The New York Times | September 2020
“The most powerful people in the United States pass our laws, run Hollywood’s studios and head the most prestigious universities. They own pro sports teams and determine who goes to jail and who goes to war. … Even where there have been signs of progress, greater diversity has not always translated to more equal treatment.”

3. Spanish court sends ex-colonel to prison for 1989 Jesuit killings in El Salvador
By J.J. Galvez | El Pais | September 2020
“Over three decades after a massacre that drew international attention, Inocente Orlando Montano was found guilty of ‘terrorist’ crimes”

4. Will This Be a Lost Year for America’s Children?
By Emily Bazelon | The New York Times Magazine | September 2020
“As students across the country start school, education experts reckon with the long-term implications of remote learning, vanishing resources and heightened inequality.”

5. Can COVID-19 survive on my phone?
Viral Questions :: Associated Press | May 2020
“Yes. That’s why a daily wipe down of “high-touch” surfaces like phones, keyboards and tablet computers is recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.”

6. Plantain, the ‘macho banana’
By Niki Segnit | 1843 :: The Economist | April / May 2020
“Is it a fruit? Is it a vegetable? It’s definitely more than just a big banana”

7. Citigroup becomes first big Wall Street bank to be run by female CEO
By Jasper Jolly | The Guardian | September 2020
“Scottish-American banker Jane Fraser will replace Michael Corbat in February”

8. The Chocolatier for the Hip-Hop Ear
By Majorie Hernandez | Narratively | March 2014
“A soul-searching Los Angeleno finds religion in the rhythm of hip-hop and seeks to spread the faith, one sweet boom-box-shaped bite at a time.”

9. Praying in time of COVID-19: How world’s largest mosques adapted
By Arwa Ibrahim | Al Jazeera | April 2020
“As mosques ban congregational prayers due to coronavirus, many set up live-streaming to broadcast prayers and sermons.”

10. How People with Autism Forge Friendships
By Lydia Denworth | Spectrum :: Scientific American | April 2020
“Most autistic individuals want to and can make friends, though their relationships often have a distinctive quality”