Recommended reading / viewing / listening

This week: Pelosi’s war with the next generation / The evolution of the romance genre / Remembering the fall of Saigon / The T. Rex census / New histories of the UT Tower shooting

This week: Pelosi’s war with the next generation / The evolution of the romance genre / Remembering the fall of Saigon / The T. Rex census / New histories of the UT Tower shooting

Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism. Learn more about my academic background here.

1. Inside Nancy Pelosi’s War With AOC and the Squad
By Susan Page | Politico Magazine | April 2021
“How the House speaker put Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in her place.”

2. How the romance genre found its happily ever after
By Angela Haupt | The Washington Post | April 2021
“Here, a dozen people — authors, editors, agents, cover artists and one mononymous male model — recount how the modern romance industry came together and took off.”

3. The Rhymes And Reasons Behind Re-Recording Your Own Classics
By Annie Zaleski | NPR | April 2021
“In general, the reasons for these re-records are simple: financial control and creative ownership.”

4. The Wizard in the White City
By Kirstin Butler | American Experience :: PBS | April 2021
“L. Frank Baum’s long and winding road to Oz, and the Chicago World’s Fair that inspired his life’s work.”

5. How many Tyrannosaurus rex walked the Earth?
By Ashley Poust and Daniel Varajão de Latorre | The Conversation | April 2021
“To estimate population, our team of paleontologists and scientists had to combine the extraordinarily comprehensive existing research on T. rex with an ecological principle that connects population density to body size.”

6. Forty years on from the fall of Saigon: Witnessing the end of the Vietnam war
By Martin Woollacott | The Guardian | April 2015
“Much suffering and grief lay in the past, but there was a presentiment, even as things ended in Saigon, that the future held more of the same.”

7. How to Collect Firewood
By Malia Wollan | Tip :: The New York Times Magazine | March 2021
“To cut enough wood to keep a house warm for the winter, you’ll need to know your way around a chain saw.”

8. Behind the Tower: New Histories of the UT Tower Shooting
By Christopher Rose, Joan Neuberger and Henry Wiencek | 15 Minute History :: UT Department of History | 2014-2020
Also see: 1968 – The Year the Dream Died | Harvey Milk, Forty Years Later | Stokely Carmichael: A Life | The History of the Family

9. What’s next for Cuba and the United States after Raul Castro’s retirement
By Joseph J. Gonzalez | The Conversation | April 2021
“Cuban President Miguel Díaz Canel, who took office in 2018 after Raul Castro stepped down as president, has resisted calls for democratic reforms and has pressing economic issues to manage, as well as a pandemic. So does his American counterpart, President Joe Biden. The White House recently said Cuba policy is ‘not a top priority.’ ”

10. Frankenstein
By Melvyn Bragg | In Our Time :: BBC 4 | 2010-2019
Also see: Shinto | The Hippocratic Oath | Thomas Edison | Cleopatra

Recommended reading / viewing / listening

This week: Healing in cold water / Selena thrives on TikTok / The benefits of oak trees / Microaggressions / Low tech interventions for loneliness

This week: Healing in cold water / Selena thrives on TikTok / The benefits of oak trees / Microaggressions / Low tech interventions for loneliness

Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism. Learn more about my academic background here.

1. Women Are Instrumental To Latin Music
By Anamaria Sayre and Felix Contreras | Alt Latino :: NPR | March 2021
“Latin music has a history of disenfranchising women. They’re often placed behind the mic or in the background — assuming they’re allowed to participate at all.”

2. Cold comfort: How cold water swimming cured my broken heart
By Wendell Steavenson | The Guardian | March 2021
“I never in a million years thought I would be a person who would enjoy swimming in cold water. I swam when the weather was hot, or did laps in indoor swimming pools; I spent a lot of time in the bath. I loved the water, but I was like a cat, I liked being warm more.”

3. Selena Is Still Alive on TikTok
By Daise Bedolla | The Cut :: New York Magazine | March 2021
“Selena impersonations are particularly popular around Halloween when fans and celebrities … transform themselves into la reina de Tejano. … But scroll through the app, and you’ll find much more than just impersonations.”

4. Why You Should Plant Oaks
By Margaret Roach | The New York Times | March 2021
“These large, long-lived trees support more life-forms than any other trees in North America. And they’re magnificent.”

5. In Hotter Climate, ‘Zombie’ Urchins Are Winning And Kelp Forests Are Losing
By Lauren Sommer | NPR | March 2021
“Kelp forests provide a crucial ecosystem for a broad range of other marine life and animals, so their demise threatens the ecology across the entire stretch of California coast.”

6. How Animal Intelligence Helps Us Speculate About the Alien Mind
By Arik Kershenbaum | Lit Hub | March 2021
“Intelligence evolves all the time to fit specific needs — it is not merely an inherited trait from the dawn of time.”

7. Microaggressions: Death by a Thousand Cuts
By Derald Wing Sue | Opinion :: Scientific American | March 2021
“The everyday slights, insults and offensive behaviors that people of marginalized groups experience in daily interactions cause real psychological harm”

8. Operation Intercept
By Christopher Rose, Joan Neuberger and Henry Wiencek | 15 Minute History :: UT Department of History | 2014-2020
Also see: Seven Skeletons | The Search for Family Lost in Slavery | Rethinking the Agricultural ‘Revolution’ | How Jews Translate the Bible and Why

9. Loneliness Is a Public Health Problem: This Low-Tech Intervention Can Help
By Kasra Zarei | Scientific American | March 2021
“Phone calls may be integral to connecting with people who are lonely and isolated”

10. Napoleon’s Retreat from Moscow
By Melvyn Bragg | In Our Time :: BBC 4 | 2011-2019
Also see: The Druids | Xenophon | The Anatomy of Melancholy | Islamic Law and its Origins

Recommended reading / viewing / listening

This week: Understanding your zodiac sign / Saving the butterflies / Pence lays groundwork for the future / Sharon Stone’s story / New insight into Pliny’s masterpiece

This week: Understanding your zodiac sign / Saving the butterflies / Pence lays groundwork for the future / Sharon Stone’s story / New insight into Pliny’s masterpiece

Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism. Learn more about my academic background here.

1. Save the Butterflies — but Not to Save Our Food Supply
By Erica Fleishman | Opinion :: Scientific American | March 2021
“These insects are lovely, but despite what many think, they aren’t significant contributors to pollinating agriculturally important plants”

2. How to Understand Every Zodiac Sign, by Element
The Cut :: New York Magazine | March 2021
“The signs are grouped into four elements — fire, water, earth, and air — with three signs in each.”

3. How to make sure Biden’s infrastructure plan can hold up to climate change – and save money
By Jeremy Bricker | The Conversation | March 2021
“In the Netherlands, some flood control systems are designed to adapt to future climate change.”

4. Insurrections, Indigenous Power, & The Empire for Slavery in the Southwest
By Max Flormen | Muster :: The Journal of the Civil War Era | March 2021
“The realities of Indigenous power, marronage, and Mexico’s emancipation policies haunted Anglo-American visions of a white supremacist imperial order in the trans-Mississippi West.”

5. Trump’s heir? Pence reemerges, lays groundwork for 2024 run
By Jill Colvin | Associated Press | March 2021
“The former vice president is steadily reentering public life as he eyes a potential run for the White House in 2024. He’s joining conservative organizations, writing op-eds, delivering speeches and launching an advocacy group that will focus on promoting the Trump administration’s accomplishments.”

6. Seeing Isaac Woodard
By Kirstin Butler | American Experience :: PBS | March 2021
“Remembering the WWII veteran beyond the vicious racist attack that blinded him.”

7. The Essential Larry McMurtry
By Tina Jordan | The New York Times Book Review | March 2021
“The Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist and Academy Award-winning screenwriter explored the myths and legacies of the West in his work.”

8. Fishmeal—The Superfood That Never Was
By Christopher Rose, Joan Neuberger and Henry Wiencek | 15 Minute History :: UT Department of History | 2014-2020
Also see: Simone de Beauvoir and ‘The Second Sex’ | What Writing Can Tell Us About the Arabs before Islam | The Trans-Pacific Silver Trade and Early-Modern Globalization | Colonial Medicine and STDs in 1920s Uganda

9. Sharon Stone Is Telling Her Side of the Story
By Dave Itzkoff | The New York Times | March 2021
“The actress and star of films like Basic Instinct and Casino writes about her life, upbringing and brushes with death in a new memoir, The Beauty of Living Twice.”

10. President Ulysses S Grant
By Melvyn Bragg | In Our Time :: BBC 4 | 2010-2019
Also see: The Unicorn | The Spanish Armada | The Delphic Oracle | Pliny’s Natural History