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“Why is this not digitized?” A/V Edition

The Top Shelf

From time to time, we’re asked the question “so when will all of this be online?”  The answer is—you might want to sit down for this—not everything will be digitized.  While we love to connect our patrons with every resource they could ever want to use online, there are several reasons why we’re just not able to do this for everything.  Below I’ll outline some reasons why we might not digitize audiovisual (A/V) items in our collections.

NotEverythingIsDigitized Not everything is digitized. This is the truth.

Prioritizing projects

Digitization takes a lot of resources, both in physical resources and in people hours, so we want to be sure we’re getting the most out of our efforts.  We do our best to find content to digitize that will have the highest degree of utility for our patrons, so this means we put a lot of effort into assessment. Readers…

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Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism.

1. Are Blind People Denied Their Sexuality?
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2. Data isn’t the new oil — it’s the new nuclear power
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3. When the End of Human Civilization Is Your Day Job
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4. The Pap test could eventually be replaced by the HPV test, some experts say
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Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism.

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Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism.

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10. What does ‘normal’ mean in abnormal times
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Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism.

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Gallery

Special Collections travels to Mexico City

Beautiful

The Top Shelf

During the first week of this month, Rare Books Librarian Agnieszka Czeblakow and I had the opportunity to travel to Mexico City for the annual Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials (SALALM) conference. This year’s theme was “Sites/Cites, Texts, and Voices in Critical Librarianship: Decolonizing Libraries and Archives.”

As a first-time attendee, I was excited to learn that SALALM is so interdisciplinary; the event brought together librarians, archivists, book dealers, curators, scholars, and other professionals. Our shared goal was to think critically about how processes of selection, organization, and description give shape to research and teaching on Latin America, Iberia, and the Caribbean.

I was able to participate in a wide variety of activities, including panels composed of experts discussing issues relevant to all institutions that collect Latin American materials (UTSA included). I learned how other institutions think critically about their holdings, develop innovative workflows…

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A pocket guide to Totonac, an endangered language.

Fascinating. What an amazing find.

The Top Shelf

As the digitization of the Sons of the Republic of Texas Mexican Manuscript Collection (SRT) in its entirety progresses, I continue to be amazed and pleasantly surprised by some of the hidden gems that are buried in the unassuming SRT filing cabinets in the Special Collections vault. One of those wonderful moments happened recently when I came upon document 5794, “Vocabulario de la lengua Totonaca.” The vague title featured in the metadata does not do this incredibly interesting document justice. Document 5794 is so much more than just a “vocabulary.” Its cover contains a striking  example of calligraphy, the contents are interesting, unique, and exciting. The document provides a glimpse into the diversity of eighteenth-century Mexico. It features one of the 68 indigenous languages officially recognized by the Mexican government that are still spoken today.

txsau-srt-5794_00001 not cropped

The name Totonac ecompasses a cluster of approximately 9 closely-related languages still spoken by…

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