Recommended reading / viewing / listening

This week: Biden’s first hundred days / The second impeachment / A new look at kangaroos / Romulus and Remus / The Spanish Inquisition

This week: Biden’s first hundred days / The second impeachment / A new look at kangaroos / Romulus and Remus / The Spanish Inquisition

Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism. Learn more about my academic background here.

1. Donald Trump impeached a second time over mob attack on US Capitol
By Lauren Gambino | The Guardian | January 2021
“The sole article of impeachment charges the defeated president with ‘inciting an insurrection’ that led to what the House speaker, Nancy Pelosi, said would be immortalized as a ‘day of fire’ on Capitol Hill.”
Also see, from Foreign Affairs: Present at the Destruction
Also see, from The Washington Post: Four years ago, I wondered if the media could handle Trump. Now we know.
Also see, from The Lily: One way women in D.C. are trying to identify pro-Trump rioters? Dating apps.
Also see, from The New York Times: A Preordained Coda to a Presidency
Also see, from NPR Public Editor: From ‘Protest’ To ‘Riot’ To ‘Insurrection’ — How NPR’s Language Evolved

2. The hundred day mistake
By Alasdair Roberts | The Wilson Quarterly | Winter 2021
“Is an FDR-style legislative blitz the best way forward in our present crisis?”

3. World’s oldest painting of animals discovered in an Indonesian cave
By Ibrahim Sawal | New Scientist | January 2021
“The paintings of three pigs, alongside several hand stencils, were discovered in the limestone cave of Leang Tedongnge on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi.”

4. Vogue’s Kamala Harris cover shows that diminishing powerful Black women is still in fashion
By Karen Attiah | Opinion :: The Washington Post | January 2021
“In life, as in boxing, it’s often the punches you don’t see coming that knock you out.”

5. Queen Bee Sperm Storage Holds Clues to Colony Collapse
By Karen Kwon | Scientific American | January 2021
“Analyzing fluid from queen bees’ specialized sperm sacs can expose stressors”

6. Will COVID-19 vaccines work on the new coronavirus variant?
Associated Press | December 2020
“Experts believe so, but they’re working to confirm that.”

7. ‘A Social Species’: How Kangaroos Communicate With People
By Yan Zhuang | The New York Times | December 2020
“Researchers say that kangaroos are the first wild animals to exhibit interspecies communication that is more commonly seen in animals that have evolved alongside humans.”

8. The End of Colonialism in South Asia
By Christopher Rose, Joan Neuberger and Henry Wiencek | 15 Minute History :: UT Department of History | 2014-2020
Also see: The Spanish Inquisition | The Haitian Revolution | America’s Entry in to World War I | Simón Bolívar

9. How to Build a Covert Fire
By Malia Wollan | Tip :: The New York Times Magazine | December 2020
“First, find a suitable place to dig. Look for firm soil, not too rocky or sandy; a trowel, while not strictly necessary, will make the job easier.”

10. Tutankhamun
By Melvyn Bragg | In Our Time :: BBC 4 | 2013-2020
Also see: Epicureanism | The War of 1812 | Romulus and Remus | Comets

Recommended reading / viewing / listening

This week: A guide to impeachment / How do you attach to people? / What happens to Meghan Markle’s royal wardrobe? / Mysteries of Kim Kardashian’s fridge / The search for Malaysia’s missing plane goes on

This week: A guide to impeachment / How do you attach to people? / What happens to Meghan Markle’s royal wardrobe? / Mysteries of Kim Kardashian’s fridge / The search for Malaysia’s missing plane goes on

Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism. Learn more about my academic background here.

1. What Is the Impeachment Process? A Step-by-Step Guide
By Weiyi Cai | The New York Times | January 2020
“In America’s 243-year history, only three previous presidents have faced impeachment proceedings. The Constitution does not prescribe a specific process and neither does federal law, leaving Congress to set its own rules. Here’s how the fourth impeachment has unfolded, and what to expect in the coming weeks.”
Also see: What Democrats Can Learn From the Forgotten Impeachment of James Buchanan
Also see: John Roberts likely to play modest role in impeachment trial

2. How you attach to people may explain a lot about your inner life
By Elisa Dermendzhiyska | The Guardian | January 2020
“Early interactions with caregivers can dramatically affect your beliefs about yourself, your expectations of others, and how you cope with stress and regulate your emotions as an adult.”

3. June Bacon-Bercey, pathbreaking TV meteorologist, dies at 90
By Emily Langer | The Washington Post | January 2020
“There were weathermen and weathergirls, but for generations, female meteorologists were practically unheard of. So, too, were black atmospheric scientists..”

4. Alaska man survives three weeks with little food and shelter
BBC World News | January 2020
“He lived on canned foods that survived the blaze and made a basic tent out of debris in the sub-zero temperatures.”

5. What will happen to Meghan Markle’s royal wardrobe after family exit?
By Elana Fishman | The New York Post | January 2020
“[T]he duchess has noticeably scaled back on her fashion spending lately, opting to recycle items already in her closet and lean on more affordable style staples rather than regularly debuting new finds from beloved brands like Givenchy, Stella McCartney and Roland Mouret, as she did when she first became a member of the monarchy.”
Also see: The Hypocrisy of Harry and Meghan’s Decision
Also see: Where did it all go wrong for Harry and Meghan?

6. Remembering Elizabeth Wurtzel, a Proudly Difficult Person
By Benjamin Wallace | The Cut :: New York Magazine | January 2020
“She cycled, proudly, through jobs and agents and editors and publishers. She could treat people badly. She’d blow deadlines and be rude and endlessly dramatic. More compassionate friends chalked it up, most of the time, to mental illness and drug addiction or understood it to be the collateral damage of her life force.”

7. What Really Happened to Malaysia’s Missing Airplane
By William Langewiesche | The Atlantic | June 2019
“Five years ago, the flight vanished into the Indian Ocean. Officials on land know more about why than they dare to say.”

8. The Cold Truth About Kim Kardashian’s Fridge — and Yours
By Alaina Demopoulos | The Daily Beast | January 2020
“Kim Kardashian’s minimalist fridge made a lot of people angry — or at least confused. Here’s why we get so emotional about other people’s refrigerators, and ashamed of our own.”

9. How Democrats Can Win Back Obama-Trump Defectors
By Sean McElwee and Brian F. Schaffner | The New York Times | January 2020
“They don’t have to lose their souls to do it. Just the opposite.”

10. A History of the U.S. Marine Corps
By Augusta Dell’Omo | Not Even Past :: UT Austin Department of History | September 2018
“The U.S. Marine Corps may now proudly boast to be the home of the few and the proud, but this wasn’t always the case. In the early part of the 20th century, it was the poorest funded and least respected branch of the military, and at the end of World War Two there was actually a movement to shut them down.”
Also see: Who Signs Up to Fight? Makeup of U.S. Recruits Shows Glaring Disparity

Recommended reading / viewing / listening

This week: The Native American Alamo / The depths of personal loneliness / The ultimate guide to presidential impeachment / What obsessed Hitchcock, Welles and Kubrick / Lady Gaga’s tattoos

This week: The Native American Alamo / The depths of personal loneliness / The ultimate guide to presidential impeachment / What obsessed Hitchcock, Welles and Kubrick / Lady Gaga’s tattoos

Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism.

1. NASA Captures First Air-to-Air Images of Supersonic Shockwave Interaction in Flight
By Matt Kamlet | NASA | March 2019
“The images were captured during the fourth phase of Air-to-Air Background Oriented Schlieren flights, or AirBOS, which took place at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California. ”

2. All Quiet on the Western Front becomes instant bestseller – archive, 1929
By Richard Nelsson | From the Archive :: The Guardian | March 2019
“Ninety years ago, a harrowing account of warfare in the first world war was brought to an international audience by German veteran Erich Maria Remarque”

3. Native Americans want to re-imagine Alamo as a cemetery
By Elaine Ayala | San Antonio Express-News | February 2019
“Long before it was the site of a famous battle, the Alamo was where the city’s earliest citizens lived, worked, died and were buried. They were the city’s first Catholics and helped forge the city and state’s future.”

4. What’s the Loneliest You’ve Ever Felt
By Kristen Radtke | The Atlantic | October 2018
“The author started a project on loneliness by asking this simple question. Many people quickly recounted experiences, often with surprising specificity.”

5. The only impeachment guide you’ll ever need
By Darren Samuelsohn | Politico Magazine | January 2019
“In one sense, Trump is as vulnerable as he’s always been. In another, the risk is huge. The collision of anti-Trump forces with his powerfully loyal base — to say nothing of the president’s own thirst for conflict — would guarantee the most explosive political disruption in generations. If the effort misses, the blowback could easily propel Trump back into office in 2020, with a reinvigorated base bent on revenge.”

6. Netflix Holds the Key to Preserving Film’s Vanishing History
By K. Austin Collins | Vanity Fair | November 2018
The Other Side of the Wind and Shirkers show how the streaming giant could save historic films — even as past-facing services like FilmStruck prove unsustainable.”

7. The Obsessions of Hitchcock, Welles, and Kubrick
By Jonathan Kirshner | Boston Review | June 2017
“The book concludes with the observation that our heroes shared the ability to ‘triumph’ over ‘the ordinary, the conventional, the banal.’ Certainly they did. But surely there was more.”

8. All of Lady Gaga’s tattoos and their meanings
By Melissa Minton | Page Six :: The New York Post | February 2019
“[S]he has called the left half of her body her ‘Iggy Pop’ side, and the tattoo-less right side her ‘Marilyn Monroe.’ ”

9. The dollar is still king. How (in the world) did that happen
By Peter S. Goodman | The New York Times | February 2019
“The enduring potency of the dollar gives force to President Trump’s mode of engagement.”

10. Who Killed Tulum
By Reeves Wiedeman | The Cut :: New York Magazine | February 2019
“Greed, gringos, diesel, drugs, shamans, seaweed, and a disco ball in the jungle.”

Recommended reading / viewing / listening

This week: Impeachment right out of the gate / Saving Houston from hurricanes / Turkey won’t spark WWIII / The Twitter essay / Pregnancy changes the brain

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This week: Impeachment right out of the gate / Saving Houston from hurricanes / Turkey won’t spark WWIII / The Twitter essay / Pregnancy changes the brain

Most of these great items come from my social media networks. Follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Facebook for more fascinating videos, photos, articles, essays, and criticism.

1. The Case for Donald Trump’s Impeachability
By Jesse Singal | Daily Intelligencer :: New York Magazine | Dec. 20
“Republicans control Congress now. … But [should] Trump’s popularity slip low enough, or should some new scandal engulf him, maybe the political calculus will change, too.”

2. Hell and High Water
By Neena Satija, Kiah Collier, Al Shaw, and Jeff Larson | The Texas Tribune, Reveal, and ProPublica | March 2016
“Houston is the fourth-largest city in the country. It’s home to the nation’s largest refining and petrochemical complex, where billions of gallons of oil and dangerous chemicals are stored. And it’s a sitting duck for the next big hurricane. Learn why Texas isn’t ready.”
December 2016 update: Obama signs bill that may boost Texas hurricane protection study

3. This Isn’t 1914, and the Russian Ambassador to Turkey Isn’t Franz Ferdinand
By Joshua Keating | Slate | Dec. 19
“What appears to be an attack by an extremist against a Russian diplomat on Turkish soil will provide a pretext for closer cooperation rather than conflict.”

4. In Defense of the Twitter Essay
By Jeet Heer | New Republic | Dec. 19
“Some find it obnoxious, but threading tweets is a unique writing form that creates vibrant, democratic conversations.”

5. Sigourney Weaver: ‘I’m asked to play awful people all the time’
By Emma Brockes | The Guardian | Dec. 17
“Her parents thought she was an unlikely star, but decades after Alien, Sigourney Weaver is still in the spotlight, with more monster-wrestling on the way”

6. Pregnancy Causes Lasting Changes in a Woman’s Brain
By Catherine Caruso | Scientific American | Dec. 19
“New mothers showed evidence of neural remodeling up to two years after giving birth”

7. Scanning reveals what pregnancy does to a mother’s brain
The Economist | Dec. 19
“New mothers experience reduction in the volume of grey matter in their brains”

8. The Man Behind the Most Important Chart of 2016
By James Watkins | Ozy.com | Dec. 19
“Because he can explain the appeal of Trump, Bernie, Brexit and all the rest of it in one chart.”

9. A perfect storm: Margaret Atwood on rewriting Shakespeare’s Tempest
By Margaret Atwood | The Guardian | September 2016
“How do you update a play about a castaway sorcerer, a malevolent creature and an air spirit?”

10. Locations of Presidential TV Speeches Can Give Signals
By Michael Beschloss | HistorySource :: The New York Times | September 2014
“Truman began a tradition in which presidents have been inclined to deliver some of their most important addresses into the TV camera from [the Oval Office] — most memorably, John Kennedy on Oct. 22, 1962, revealing that there were Soviet missiles in Cuba and describing his response, and Richard Nixon on Aug. 8, 1974, resigning the presidency.”